2021 popular The popular wholesale Race online sale

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Description

Product Description

Can an honest man become president? In this timely and provocative novel, a maverick candidate takes on his political enemies and the ruthless machinery of American politics
 
Corey Grace--a handsome and charismatic Republican senator from Ohio--is plunged by an act of terrorism into a fierce presidential primary battle with the favorite of the party establishment and a magnetic leader of the Christian right. A decorated Gulf War Air Force pilot known for speaking his mind, Grace''s reputation for voting his own conscience rather than the party line--together with his growing romance with Lexie Hart, an African-American movie star--has earned him a reputation as a maverick and an iconoclast. But Grace is still haunted by a tragic mistake buried deep in his past, and now his integrity will be put to the test in this most brutal of political contests, in which nothing in his past or present life is off-limits.

Depicting contemporary power politics at its most ruthless, The Race takes on the most incendiary issues in American culture:  racism, terrorism, religious fundamentalism, gay rights, and the rise of media monopolies with their own agenda and lust for power. As the pressure of the campaign intensifies, Grace encounters betrayal, excruciating moral choices, and secrets that can destroy lives. Ultimately, the race leads to a deadlocked party convention where Grace must resolve the conflict between his romance with Lexie and his presidential ambitions--and decide just who and what he is willing to sacrifice.

From Publishers Weekly

Leaving courtroom thrills behind, Patterson crafts an absorbing and suspenseful account of a dirty run for the Republican presidential nomination. Sen. Corey Grace, a Republican from Ohio, became a public hero during the Gulf War after surviving the crash of his jet and enduring months of captivity and torture. Thirteen years later, he''s 43 and one of a national magazine''s 50 sexiest men alive. Corey has a real shot at winning his party''s nomination-if, as his advisers constantly remind him, he can just rein in his impulsiveness, his party-line crossing votes and his habit of telling the truth. When Corey falls for sexy African-American actress Lexie Hart, who comes to Washington to lobby for stem cell research, Corey''s advisers wring their hands. But they soon have more pressing matters to deal with: among the other candidates in the Republican field are evangelist Rev. Bob Christy and Sen. Rob Marotta of Pennsylvania-a man under the de facto control of Machiavellian campaign director Magnus Price, The Darth Vader of American politics. The perfidy and mendacity that follow mesmerize as much as they ring true. (Oct.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Patterson''s latest absorbing thriller centers on a timely topic, a heated presidential primary. Corey Grace is a war hero turned moderate Republican senator who is considering a run for president. Honest and somewhat unpredictable, he is reluctant to get into a race he knows will be drawn out and ugly. Complicating matters is his burgeoning relationship with Lexie Hart, an African American actress who also happens to be a liberal and a former heroin addict. Once he enters the race, Corey faces two fierce opponents: Rob Marrotta, a senator groomed from infancy for the presidency who is willing to do anything to win the nomination, and Bob Christy, an earnest but unrelenting evangelical. The contest comes down to two hot-button topics: stem-cell research and gay rights, and Corey''s views do not match those of his opponents or the most conservative voters in his party. Marrotta''s unscrupulous campaign manager makes it his mission to smear both Corey and Bob Christy, bringing the men together in an unexpected way. Initially readers will recognize similarities between actual political figures and Patterson''s characters, but once the story starts cooking, the characters step beyond their molds. For anyone fascinated by how American politics works, this is a gripping read. Huntley, Kristine

Review

“An electrifying page-turner.”—Seattle Post-Intelligencer

“Absorbing and suspenseful.”— Publishers Weekly

“Patterson has redefined himself as a writer wililng to take risks."— USA TODAY
 
“Required reading.”— New York Post

“With verve, intelligence, passion and humanity, Patterson tells an important story—and one that may find a place with Advise and Consent and Seven Days in May on the shelf of honored political thrillers.”—Richmond Times-Dispatch

“Absorbing…timely…a gripping read.”—Booklist         

“Will get your blood boiling…”—Grand Rapid Press

“A timely, fast-paced political yarn....Highly recommended.” —Library Journal (starred review)

“A slick new entertainment…Frank Capra idealism meets Karl Rove reality.”—Entertainment Weekly

About the Author

Richard North Patterson is the author of In The Name Of Honor, Eclipse, The Spire, Exile, The Race, Degree Of Guilt, Eyes Of A Child, Silent Witness, and many other bestselling and critically acclaimed novels. Formerly a trial lawyer, he was the SEC liaison to the Watergate special prosecutor and has served on the boards of several Washington advocacy groups. He lives in Martha''s Vineyard, San Francisco, and Cabo San Lucas with his wife, Dr. Nancy Clair.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Prologue

In the timeless dark of his captivity, before the president made him a hero for the careless act that had cost a friend his life, Captain Corey Grace distracted himself from guilt and the pain of torture by recalling why he had wished to fly: to escape from darkness to light.

His earliest memories were of the metaphoric prison of his parents’ joyless house: the way his father’s mute and drunken rage turned inward on itself; his mother’s tight-lipped repression of her own misery, as clenched as her coiled hair. Even the Ohio town they lived in, Lake City, felt cramped—not just the near-identical shotgun houses and postage-stamp lawns, but the monochromatic lives of those who never seemed to leave, the gossip one could never erase, the pointless bigotry against minorities no one had ever met. Only in captivity, when shame and belated charity eroded his contempt for his family and his past, did Corey see this pitiless lens as yet another reflection of his vanity.

You’re special, they had always told him: teachers, coaches, ministers—even, in their crabbed ways, Corey’s own mother and father. From his early youth, good looks had been among his many gifts: the ready smile and dark brown eyes—perceptive, alert, and faintly amused—strong but regular features, arrayed in pleasing proportion to one another. He excelled in school; became captain of three sports teams; grew articulate and quick-witted in a way he could not trace to either parent; learned to conceal his alienation with an easy charm that made girls want him and other boys want to be like him. His parents were strangers—not just to Corey, but to each other.

“I wonder who you’ll marry,” his mother had mused aloud on the night of his senior prom.

Needlessly fussing over his tuxedo tie—as open a gesture of maternal fondness as she could muster—Nettie Grace looked up into his face. With an instinctive fear that, somehow, this life would ensnare him, Corey realized that his mother still wished to imagine him marrying someone from Lake City—maybe Kathy Wilkes, the bubbly cheerleader who was his prom date. Perhaps his mother spoke from sentiment, Corey thought; perhaps it was only fear that he would leave their life behind. Even his parents’ pride in him seemed sullied by their own resentments.

Gazing into his mother’s eyes, he answered softly, “No one from here.”

Nettie Grace let go of his bow tie.

Slowly, Corey looked around the tiny living room, as if at a place he would never see again. His father stared at the television, a beer bottle clutched in hands knotted from his work as a plumber. In the corner, Corey’s five-year-old brother, Clay—whose very existence conjured images Corey could scarcely entertain—gazed up at Corey with a child’s admiration. Looking at this slight boy’s tousled brown hair and innocent blue eyes, Corey felt the empathy he wished he could summon for his parents. He already sensed that Clay—who, to his father’s evident satisfaction, did not seem all that special—would never escape their family.

Impulsively, Corey scooped Clay up in his arms, tossing him in the air before bringing the boy’s face close to his. Clay wrapped his arms around Corey’s neck.

“I love you, Corey,” he heard his little brother declare.

For a moment, Corey held Clay tight; then he lifted him aloft again, wondering why his own smile did not come quite so easily. “Yeah,” he told his brother. “I love you, too. Even though you’re short.”

Putting Clay down, Corey kissed him on the forehead, and left without another word to anyone.

He was leaving them all behind—his mother and father; the friends who thought they knew him; the prom date who would offer to sleep with him in hope that this moment, the apex of her youthful imaginings, was a beginning and not the end; even his kid brother. And he had known this ever since Coach Jackson had named him starting quarterback. “You’re slow,” the coach had told him laconically. “And your arm’s no better than average. But you’re smart, and you don’t rattle. Most of all, you’re not just a leader—you’re a born leader.”

This, Corey realized, was a new thought. Curious, he asked, “What’s the difference?”

“You never look back to see who’s following you.” The coach cocked his head, as though studying Corey from a different angle. “Ever think about one of the academies? West Point, maybe.”

Mulling this, Corey walked home on a brisk fall day. Then he looked up and saw a jet plane soaring into endless space and light, its only mark a trail of vapor. No, Corey thought, not West Point.

His appointment to the Air Force Academy came as easily as his moment of departure. He left his parents and brother at the airport after constricted hugs and awkward silences, troubled only by how small and solitary Clay suddenly appeared to him.

It was the first time Corey Grace had ever flown.
 
 
The Academy, too, came easily, as did flight school and promotion. By the time of the Gulf War, Captain Corey Grace was stationed in Saudi Arabia, restlessly awaiting the ultimate test of his abilities: to engage Iraqi pilots at supersonic speeds with such skill that he would kill without being killed.

To Corey, his F-15 was an extension of his gifts, a perfectly crafted machine with the technology in its sinews ready to do his every bidding. The only other human variable was his navigator.

Joe Fitts was a black man from Birmingham, Alabama. When Corey first met him he almost laughed in dismay—Joe’s toothy smile and jug ears made him look, in Corey’s reluctant but uncharitable estimate, like a guileless and even comic figure, and his loose-limbed gait suggested that he was held together by rubber bands. But, for Corey, their first flight transformed his navigator’s appearance.

Joe’s mind was as keen as his eyes: he seemed to know everything there was to know about his job—and Corey’s. A few more flights together confirmed Corey’s sense of a man whose judgment was as close to perfect as mortals could achieve; a few sessions at the bar built for thirsty officers suggested that Joe was a complicated but altogether stellar human being. And that Joe was the first black man Corey had known well confronted him with a basic truth: that whatever Corey thought of his youth in Lake City, he had been, in one very basic sense, privileged.

Joe’s father was a janitor, his mother a seamstress, and their lives were molded by a time and place where the insane logic of bigotry skipped no details, right down to separate drinking fountains to keep blacks from sullying whites. Joe’s parents were first allowed to vote in 1965, the year after he was born, filled with foreboding that this reckless act might leave their child an orphan. But though they were even more lightly educated than Corey’s parents, Joe’s pride in his father and mother was as deep as his love—they had wrung from the harsh strictures of their lives the fierce determination to give Joe Fitts chances they had only dreamed of. The sole fissure between Joe and his devoutly Baptist parents was one that he concealed from them: except when he was home, Joe never went to church.

“So you’re an atheist?” Corey asked one evening.

Sitting beside Corey at the bar, Joe sipped his Scotch, regarding the question with narrow eyes. “Atheism’s too much trouble,” he answered. “Why put that level of energy into something you can’t know? Anyone who tells you they’re sure that there is a God—or isn’t one—is smoking dope.

“Anyhow, it’s the wrong question. Maybe there is a God, and he’s a terrific guy—or girl, or hermaphrodite, or whatever the fuck people want to believe. I’ve got no objections to that. What pisses me off is when people think believing in a certain God gives them a license to crap on other people, or even kill ’em—Christian or Muslim, it makes no difference.” He turned to Corey. “Ever look at those old pictures of lynchings—upright white folks with their good day’s work hanging from some tree?”

“Sure.”

“Notice anything peculiar about them?”

“Yeah. The black guy was dead.” Corey paused, then ventured, “No women?”

“Look again—in high school I made a study of them. What you’ll notice is that a lot of those mobs were dressed in their Sunday best. They were fresh from church, you see.” Joe’s half smile conveyed both wonder and dismay. “I’ve met some true Christians, and I’ve also met some nasty fuckers whose God is surely created in their image. Overall, I’d say the correlation between godliness and goodness is kind of random. Sort of makes you wonder what history would look like if more folks had believed a little less.”

But such moody ruminations did not detract from Joe’s pleasure in the core of his life—a deep pride in a job well done, and an abiding love for his wife and four-year-old son. “You know why I don’t want to die?” Joe admitted over drinks. “Not ’cause I’m afraid that it’s the end—that all I’ll be is roadkill. It’s because of all I’d miss, and all they’d miss about me. It’s bad enough just being stuck with you in this fucking bar.”...

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Top reviews from the United States

Barbara Lane
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
DRAGGING UP THE DIRTY LAUNDRY OF THE OPPONENTS
Reviewed in the United States on September 24, 2009
As an Australian and not understanding your politics very well I have accepted this as a great story. This book provides an insight into the process of electing a presidential canditate whilst still keeping the reader interested in the developing storyline I am... See more
As an Australian and not understanding your politics very well I have accepted this as a great story. This book provides an insight into the process of electing a presidential canditate whilst still keeping the reader interested in the developing storyline

I am surprised at so many bad reviews on it. It''s just a story and doesn''t matter which political party you follow this book should be judged as a story not on the politics.

This is a page turner from start to finish.

The cutthroat world of Politics! You enter a policital race then you drag up dirty laundry on your opponents, destroying lives, marriages, and you don''t care.

I loved Corey and Lexie, their relationship and their honesty with each other. Corey goes on vacation with Lexie and there are people sneaking around taking pictures of intimate moments for the newspapers I don''t envy those people one bit.

Patterson keeps you wondering about the outcome of the story right up to the last couple of pages - I was surprised at the ending but hey I am not the author it''s his choice.
I''m glad that I read this book.

If you don''t enjoy politics and the government you won''t like this book. I listened to this on audio and was enthralled!!!! This is not a story I will forget soon!!!!!!
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C. Holliday
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Sleazy Inside View of the Political Process
Reviewed in the United States on November 2, 2011
I listened to the unabridged audio version and mostly loved it. I say, ''mostly,'' because there are a few sections where politicos are talking shop that get a bit tedious. However, I found it worth the listen or read because it has great characters, an engaging love story,... See more
I listened to the unabridged audio version and mostly loved it. I say, ''mostly,'' because there are a few sections where politicos are talking shop that get a bit tedious. However, I found it worth the listen or read because it has great characters, an engaging love story, a protagonist with real integrity and, most of all, it gave me a mind''s picture of just how sleazy and uncompromising the American political process has become. Maybe you already know the political process is sleazy as I did. But, as with me, if you haven''t seen or heard a word picture of just how much crap goes on behind the scenes you can''t possibly have an idea why candidates say the things they do or take the positions they take. As I said, the protagonist is a man of real integrity, someone who won''t back away from the things in which he truly believes. I liked that about him. I liked that he was willing to risk it all for the sake of someone he loved. But I have serious doubts that such a person would even become a top contender for the presidential nomination in the Democratic Party. And this particular protagonist with his particular convictions wouldn''t have a snow ball''s chance in hell of becoming a top contender for the Republican nomination. So it''s a novel that tells the truth about the sleaze while, at the same time, proposing a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination that is purest fantasy. I wish it weren''t so.
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BookLover47
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another good book by Patterson
Reviewed in the United States on April 1, 2018
I am a fan of Richard North Patterson and this book did not disappoint. It is amazing that a book written so many years ago captured what is going on in our political system and in the media today . While some of the components of the story are dated, the overall feel of... See more
I am a fan of Richard North Patterson and this book did not disappoint. It is amazing that a book written so many years ago captured what is going on in our political system and in the media today . While some of the components of the story are dated, the overall feel of what we are fed by the media and politicians rings true . It is not a particularly uplifting picture that Patterson has painted . But is worth examining and reflecting on.
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Story of american politics; Action packed must read
Reviewed in the United States on April 17, 2012
ok, this was not my go to book. I choose it based upon another reader''s review list. This book is about the gritty business of politics and it had totally depressed. This is a fictional book but I know it''s based upon the facts of american politics which is why... See more
ok, this was not my go to book. I choose it based upon another reader''s review list.

This book is about the gritty business of politics and it had totally depressed. This is a fictional book but I know it''s based upon the facts of american politics which is why I was so disgusted.

The focal point of the story, whic is excellent, is a war hero running for president on the Republican ticket. The story line weaves a strong current of religion with an understated yet pivitol romance.

Side note: As a Believer, this books shows how "Christians" are being pimped.

The book was non-stop movement so you won''t get bored but the lies, back-stabbing, deceit, etc. that takes place epitomizes why so many of us are scared for America. Very few politicians care; it''s all propaganda to get selfish needs met while America falls into despair. But as long as "me and mine" are getting what we can get; who cares. Yet "these people" call themselves "real Americans".

It''s a good read that will gaurantee to get you mad as heck!
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Caroline Muller
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another great read from Richard North Patterson
Reviewed in the United States on June 26, 2014
I have now read all of Patterson''s book to date and am anxiously awaiting his new one out in July 2014. The Race wonderfully crafted story,with characters you will enjoy getting to know and remember. While I did not think it was one of the top three... See more
I have now read all of Patterson''s book to date and am anxiously awaiting his new one out in July 2014.

The Race wonderfully crafted story,with characters you will enjoy getting to know and remember.

While I did not think it was one of the top three of his books, I still enjoyed it very much and I would recommend it to any adult reader; it is not meant for children.

I particularly enjoyed getting to know his main character, who was somewhat different than those of his other books. He was very real and I thought the character was beautifully created.
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Susan Cameron
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Truly Informing Novel
Reviewed in the United States on September 17, 2015
It saddens me to read a book like this that clearly delineates how politics can become and probably are. It''s so real that you''d wonder about which politicians with their wealthiest contributors and election managers played the parts. I''ve always believed we should rid... See more
It saddens me to read a book like this that clearly delineates how politics can become and probably are. It''s so real that you''d wonder about which politicians with their wealthiest contributors and election managers played the parts. I''ve always believed we should rid ourselves of the electoral college in favor of the popular vote and this novel gels that opinion.
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Leonardo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A novel that mirrors the national political landscape
Reviewed in the United States on April 6, 2015
A political novel that mirrors reality. A good choice for a book group because it allows for discussion of issues through the ''proxy'' characters of the novel.
2 people found this helpful
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Goldendale Gal
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Race is Disappointing
Reviewed in the United States on October 12, 2013
I''ve read many books by Richard North Patterson and found them immensely enjoyable and thought-provoking. However, this book seemed like a vehicle to expound on the author''s views on bi-racial marriage and gays. The plot centers around a presidential election with two... See more
I''ve read many books by Richard North Patterson and found them immensely enjoyable and thought-provoking. However, this book seemed like a vehicle to expound on the author''s views on bi-racial marriage and gays. The plot centers around a presidential election with two Republicans vying for the office. I happen to agree with the writer''s views but would have preferred more character and plot development. Actually, it was a bit of a grind to finish reading.
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Top reviews from other countries

millhall
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Dirty politics.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 9, 2018
This author had passed me by. I presume when he was at his height, I had no time to read novels. I am pleased to have discovered him. He writes well from a good knowledge base. The style is fairly standard and somewhat cliched but overall this is a good read. Considering...See more
This author had passed me by. I presume when he was at his height, I had no time to read novels. I am pleased to have discovered him. He writes well from a good knowledge base. The style is fairly standard and somewhat cliched but overall this is a good read. Considering that the book was written in 2005, the concepts are remarkably prescient. Topics covered include stem cell research, abortion, evolution, Fundamentalist Christianity, race relations and interrace marriage. Homosexuality and same sex marriage almost dominate the book and the plot.The idea of building a wall between Mexico and the USA Is even suggested. Now, here was me thinking that someone else had thought of that. The characters are a little too perfect, with a gorgeous black film star and a too good to be true war hero turned politician. They live in a world of limitless money, private jets and homes in Martha''s Vineyard and Central America. Given the background of the author, the story gives a real insight into the dirty world of American politics, based on the Republican nomination for a forthcoming election. The hero is loosely but obviously based on John McCain and many of the Obama themes are central to the story. If anything the storytelling is a little "too slick", but I enjoyed the book as a holiday read and the almost obligatory twist in the tale was well delivered. I will read more by this man.
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savanatbunnie
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not up to his standard
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 22, 2014
Disappointed, always enjoyed Richard North Patterson, but after several attempts, have abandoned all hope of actually finishing this book,
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jayessbark
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
confusing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 6, 2014
I had difficulty in keeping up with the growing number of characters and feel that this book failed to deliver the high standards of the author,s other novels.
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LeeBay
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not his best
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 26, 2012
If this was the first RNP novel I would have tried more by this author. I enjoyed it but had been spoiled by a couple of earlier ones.
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Janie U
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Frightening insight into American politics
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 12, 2008
I know this book is fiction but I also know that Richard North Patterson researches his books in great detail and is in contact with a lot of people in US politics - having to believe that there are some elements of truth in the plot is very frightening and made me have...See more
I know this book is fiction but I also know that Richard North Patterson researches his books in great detail and is in contact with a lot of people in US politics - having to believe that there are some elements of truth in the plot is very frightening and made me have even less belief in politicians than previously. On the cover the main character is described as an honest man which is the basis of his personality, although even he has many secrets and failings. I loved reading the book and particularly enjoyed all the behind the scenes negotiating and deal making, although at times it did become overly complex, leaving me with the feeling that the book started off much larger and was condensed into a manageable size at the editing stage. The excitement built up heading towards the end of the book and the ending was very well written.
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